Make your own free website on Tripod.com







Abdominal Distention














Home | Page Title | New Page Title





RETURN TO THE LINKS PAGE
















































PORPHYRIA FACTS: ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS



ABDOMINAL DISTENTION / GASTROPARESIS



Gastroparesis is a delayed gastric emptying.



SOURCE:

Robert Johnson MD

Internal Medicine

+++++++++++



Autonomic neuropathy is a group of symptoms caused by damage to nerves

supplying the internal body structures that regulate functions such as bowel and

bladder emptying, and digestion.



SOURCE:

Elaine T. Kiriakopoulos, M.D., MSc

Department of Neurology

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Harvard University, Boston, MA.

++++++++++++



Abdominal distention and gastroparesis in acute porphyria is due to autonomic

neuropathy which is associated with the acute porphyrias.



SOURCE:

RObert Johnson MD

Internal Medicine

+++++++++++





Gastroparesis is the failure of the stomach to empty because of decreased

gastric motility.



Normally, your stomach contracts slowly to squeeze solid food into small

particles.



Your stomach pushes these compressed solids and liquids into the small bowel.



With gastroparesis, the stomach is paralyzed, so its function is greatly reduced

or lost.



Because the stomach isn’t moving the food into the small bowel, it stays in the

stomach longer than normal.



SOURCE:

Milton Hershey Medical Center

Pennsylvania State Medical School

++++++++++++++

Damage to the nerves of the gastrointestinal tract causes decreased ability to

move food during digestion (decreased gastric motility), resulting in symptoms

such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, and abdominal bloating.



SOURCE:

Elaine T. Kiriakopoulos, M.D., MSc

Department of Neurology

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Harvard University, Boston, MA.

++++++++++++



The sympathetic nervous system regulates the process of urine storage in the

bladder.



In contrast, the parasympathetic nervous system controls bladder contractions

and the passage of urine.



SOURCE:

Martin Morrison PA

Urology

+++++++++





Gastroparesis is a fairly frequent medical problem. While causing distressing

symptoms in some patients, it rarely causes serious medical problems.



SOURCE:

Jackson Gastroenterology

423 North 21st Street, Suite 100

Camp Hill, PA 17011

+++++++++++



Gastroparesis is a condition in which the stomach's ability to empty its contents

is impaired, unrelated to obstruction.



SOURCE:

Andrew J. Muir, M.D. M.H.S.

Division of Gastroenterology

Duke University Medical Center

Durham, NC.

+++++++++++++

Lesions of the peripheral nerves or the sacral micturition center cause detrusor

areflexia that manifests as distended bladder with overflow incontinence.



SOURCE:

Martin Morrison PA

Urology

++++++++



The cause is unknown, but disruption of nerve stimulation to the intestine may

be responsible.



SOURCE:

Andrew J. Muir, M.D. M.H.S.

Division of Gastroenterology

Duke University Medical Center

Durham, NC.

+++++++++++++



Visceral neuropathy in the acute porphyrias is a high risk factor for

gastroparesis.



SOURCE:

Robert Johnson MD

Internal Medicine

+++++++++++





Risk factors for gastroparesis include diabetes, visceral neuropathy, and use of

anticholinergic medication.



SOURCE:

Andrew J. Muir, M.D. M.H.S.

Division of Gastroenterology

Duke University Medical Center

Durham, NC.

+++++++++++++



Symptoms of gastroparesis mimic the basic symptoms of the acute porphyrias.



Such symptoms include nausea, vomiting, abdominal distention, and poor

control of blood sugars in diabetes.



SOURCE:

Robert Johnson MD

Internal Medicine

+++++++++++



The usual symptoms of gastroparesis are a feeling of fullness after only a few

bites of food, bloating, excessive belching, and nausea.



At times there will be a vague, nagging ache in the upper abdomen but usually

the pain is not sharp or crampy as might occur with ulcers or a gallbladder

attack.



There may be vomiting, heartburn, or regurgitation of stomach fluid into the

mouth.



Medications that reduce or eliminate stomach acid usually don't help much.



SOURCE:

Jackson Gastroenterology

423 North 21st Street, Suite 100

Camp Hill, PA 17011

+++++++++++



The condition called gastroparesis which parallels basic signs and symptoms of

acute porphyria episodes, also mimic that of gastric reflux or GERD.



SOURCE:

Robert Johnson MD

Internal Medicine

+++++++++++





An upper GI series showing gastric retention is a test general used in

determining gastroparesis.



SOURCE:

Robert Johnson MD

Internal Medicine

+++++++++++



To accurately diagnose gastroparesis, your doctor may order tests that include

an upper-gastrointestinal (GI) series of x-rays or a gastroscopy (gastricemptying

study), which allows the doctor to look into the stomach with a scope to measure

the ability of your stomach to empty food



SOURCE:

Milton Hershey Medical Center

Pennsylvania State Medical School

++++++++++++++





Dietary management with small meals and soft foods (which should be well

cooked and well chewed) may be of benefit.



SOURCE:

Andrew J. Muir, M.D. M.H.S.

Division of Gastroenterology

Duke University Medical Center

Durham, NC.

+++++++++++++





Medications seem to provide little long-term benefit. Metoclopramide and

cholinergic medications can be used.



SOURCE:

Andrew J. Muir, M.D. M.H.S.

Division of Gastroenterology

Duke University Medical Center

Durham, NC.

+++++++++++++





Many treatments seem to provide only temporary benefit.



SOURCE:

Andrew J. Muir, M.D. M.H.S.

Division of Gastroenterology

Duke University Medical Center

Durham, NC.

+++++++++++++



Diabetics may have serious complications related to poor blood sugar control.



SOURCE:

Andrew J. Muir, M.D. M.H.S.

Division of Gastroenterology

Duke University Medical Center

Durham, NC.

+++++++++++++






DISCLAIMER
PORPHYRIA FACTS is a medical education website dedicated to helping you focus your research on the inherited metabolic diseases known as the "Porphyrias".

PORPHYRIA FACTS is for individuals seeking information on Porphyria. The specific focus is on education, and research in the porphyrias.

PORPHYRIA FACTS present medical citations from medical professionals and others qualified and knowledgeable in the porphyrias.


PORPHYRIA FACTS takes no responsibility for medical information that is discussed here. You are encouraged to always seek medical advice before trying any new protocols. Open communication with your physician is important in developing effective treatment protocols.