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AIP PORPHYRIA ABDOMINAL PAIN
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AIP - ABDOMINAL PAIN

Abdominal pain trademark of AIP

Abdominal pain is commonly associated with the attack.

SOURCE:

Acute Intermittent Porphyria

Anne LeMaistre, M.D.

1995 TMC

++++++++++++



Almost always there is severe abdominal pain of short duration in AIP.



SOURCE:

Medicine Journal

February 22 2002

Volume 3, Number 2

+++++++++++++++



Often AIP may mimic an accute inflammatory abdominal disease with severe

pain.



SOURCE:

Metabolic Disorders

Porphyrias: Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis and Treatment

Bernardo Haddock Lobo Goulart & Samanta Teixeira Basto

University Medical School, Brazil

+++++++++++



The initial and commonest manifestation of AIP is abdominal pain, which canbe

diffuse or localized, colicky.



SOURCE:

The Porphyrias

Anderson, Karl E

Cecil Textbook of Medicine,

13th ed. Mc Graw Hill,

1994.

++++++++++++





The clinical picture of AIP may mimic an accute inflammatory abdominal

disease.



SOURCE:

The Porphyrias

Anderson, Karl E

Cecil Textbook of Medicine,

13th ed. Mc Graw Hill,

1994.

+++++++++++++









The initial and commonest manifestation of AIP is abdominal pain, which can

be diffuse or localized, colicky.



SOURCE:

The Porphyrias

Anderson, Karl E

Cecil Textbook of Medicine,

13th ed. Mc Graw Hill,

1994.

++++++++++++



AIP symptoms consist of autonomic neuropathies (eg, constipation,



colicky abdominal pain, vomiting, hypertension), peripheral neuropathy,

seizures, delirium, coma, and depression.



SOURCE:

Medicine Journal

February 22 2002

Volume 3, Number 2

++++++++++++



There can be neurological changes in AIP.



SOURCE:

Acute Intermittent Porphyria

Guide to Disease

Columbia Health Systems

1996

+++++++++++



Peripheral neuropathy can present in AIP.



SOURCE:

Acute Intermittent Porphyria

Guide to Disease

Columbia Health Systems

1996

+++++++++++



In AIP mild sensory changes often accompany the predominantly motor

neuropathy--often in a "bathing trunk" distribution.



SOURCE:

British Medical Journal

Helen Thadani

Diagnosis and management of porphyria

Bristish Medical Journal

June 17, 2000

+++++++++++







AIP is characterized by potentially lethal acute attacks with abdominal pain.



SOURCE:

Molecular genetics of acute intermittent porphyria in Finland

Sami Mustajoki

Division of Endocrinology,

Department of Medicine,

University of Helsinki &

Department of Human Molecular Genetics,

National Public Health Institute, Finland

++++++++++++





The episodes of abdominal pain experienced during acute attacks may be so

severe as to indicate a need for immediate surgical exploration and intervention.



SOURCE:

Porphyria Resources

United Medical Services

1996

++++++++++++++



The most prominent fymptom of AIP is that of abdominal pain.



SOURCE:

Acute Intermittent Porphyria

Guide to Disease

Columbia Health Systems

1996

+++++++++++



Abdominal pain is the commonest manifestation of AIP.



SOURCE:

Metabolic Disorders

Porphyrias: Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis and Treatment

Bernardo Haddock Lobo Goulart & Samanta Teixeira Basto

University Medical School, Brazil

+++++++++++++





Abdominal pain is the commonest manifestation of AIP.





SOURCE:

Metabolic Disorders

Porphyrias: Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis and Treatment

Bernardo Haddock Lobo Goulart & Samanta Teixeira Basto

University Medical School, Brazil

+++++++++++++++





The abdominal pain of AIP is severe and lasts for several days.



Severe abdomen pain of short (<1 d) duration or chronic abdominal pain is

unusual."



SOURCE:

"Acute intermittent porphyria"

Thomas G DeLoughery, MD

Associate Director

Department of TransfusionMedicine

Division of Clinical Pathology

Associate Professor

Department of Medicine

Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology

Oregon Health Sciences University

Portland, Oregon

++++++++++++++





Abdominal pain experienced by the majority of AIP patients



Abdominal pain and ileus are frequent presenting symptoms in porphyria and

may occur several years before neurologic illness.



SOURCE:

Acute Peripheral Neuropathy Due toporphyria

Drs. Barohn, Sanchez & Anderson

"MUSCLE & NERVE"

July 1994

++++++++++





Abdominal exams in AIP are unremarkable



SOURCE:

Medicine Journal

February 22 2002

Volume 3, Number 2

++++++++++++



Abdominal examination in AIP usually finds nothing remarkable..



Despite the intense pain, the findings on abdominal examination often are

nonspecific.



SOURCE:

"Acute intermittent porphyria"

Thomas G DeLoughery, MD

Department of Medicine

Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology

Oregon Health Sciences University

Portland, Oregon

++++++++++++



t is believed that an imbalance in the autonomic innervation of the gut leads to

abdominal pain which is commonly associated with the attack.





The reasons are still unclear as to why the pain is present, however it is present

in almost 90 percent of all porphyric attacks.



SOURCE:

Lifelines:

Journal of Emergency Medicine

October 1998

123: 437-443

Emergency Treatment of the Porphyric Patient

Kirsch, N,.E., M.D.

++++++++++++



Abdominal pain disappears when in remission





Acute attacks of porphyria may resolve quite radpidly.The abdominal pain can

disappear within a few hours.





SOURCE:

"The Porphyrias"

Karl E. Anderson M.D.

HEPATOLOGY:

A Textbook of Liver Disease

W.B. Saunders Company

Philadephia 1996

++++++++++++



AIP abdominal pain can be colicky, diffuse or localized.



SOURCE:

The Porphyrias

Meyer, Urs A.

Harrison&#8217;s Principles of Internal Medicine,

12th ed. Mc GrawHill, 1991.

+++++++++++++







Duration of abdominal pain can last for several days.



Severe abdomen pain of short (<1 d) duration or chronic abdominal pain is

unusual.



SOURCE:

Medicine Journal

February 22 2002

Volume 3, Number 2

++++++++++++



Abdominal pain in AIP may be localized.



SOURCE:

Robert Johnson MD

Internal Medicine

+++++++++++++



Pains may last for hours or days.



SOURCE:



Dr. Robert Johnson M.D.

Retired Clinician

++++++++++



Abdominal pain is experienced by 91% of patients with Acute Intermittent

Porphyria (AIP).



SOURCE:

Porphyria

New Vision Medical Services

1997

+++++++++



AIP acute attacks present with with abdominal pain



SOURCE:

Jean-Charles Deybach, M.D., Ph.D.

Hôpital L. Mourier and Faculté de Médecine X. Bichat

Université Paris 7, France

+++++++++++



During acute attacks, whether abdominal pain is mild or severe, in most cases of

AIP, the recurring abdominal discomfort has caused patients to seek

examination.



SOURCE:

Porphyria Resources

United Medical Services

1996

++++++++++





The initial and commonest manifestation of AIP is abdominal pain, which

can be diffuse or localized, colicky.



SOURCE:

The Porphyrias

Anderson, Karl E

Cecil Textbook of Medicine,

13th ed. Mc Graw Hill,

1994.

++++++++++





The episodes of abdominal pain experienced during acute attacks may be so

severe as to indicate a need for immediate surgical exploration and

intervention.



SOURCE:

Porphyria Resources

United Medical Services

1996

+++++++++++





The abdominal pain of AIP is severe and can last for several days.



SOURCE:

"Acute intermittent porphyria"

Thomas G DeLoughery, MD

Department of Medicine

Oregon Health Sciences University

Portland, Oregon

++++++++++ ++++



The clinical picture of AIP may mimic an accute inflammatory abdominal

disease.



SOURCE:

The Porphyrias

Anderson, Karl E

Cecil Textbook of Medicine,

13th ed. Mc Graw Hill,

1994.

+++++++++++



Often the onset of an acute attack is mistaken for acute appendicitis.



SOURCE:

Robert Johnson MD

Internal Medicine

+++++++++++



Abdominal pain in AIP is localized to the epigastrium which is the upper and

middle region of the abdomen, located within the sternal angle.



It is possible for the abdominal pain to be generalized.



SOURCE:

Dr. Robert Johnson M.D.

Internal Medicine

++++++++++++++



DISCLAIMER
PORPHYRIA FACTS is a medical education website dedicated to helping you focus your research on the inherited metabolic diseases known as the "Porphyrias".

PORPHYRIA FACTS is for individuals seeking information on Porphyria. The specific focus is on education, and research in the porphyrias.

PORPHYRIA FACTS present medical citations from medical professionals and others qualified and knowledgeable in the porphyrias.


PORPHYRIA FACTS takes no responsibility for medical information that is discussed here. You are encouraged to always seek medical advice before trying any new protocols. Open communication with your physician is important in developing effective treatment protocols.

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