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BASAL GANGLION
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PORPHYRIA FACTS: BASAL GANGLION sent

Basal involvement is seen with Central nervous dysfunction
during acute attacks of porphyria in AIP, HCP and VP.

SOURCE:
Robert Johnson MD
Internal Medicine
+++++++++++++++++

There may be abnormalities in the basal ganglia.

SOURCE:

CURRENT
Medical Diagnosis & Treatment 1998
37th Edition
++++++++++++

There may be abnormalities in the basal ganglia.

SOURCE:
Inherited Porphyrias
McGovern, MM et. al.
Principles and Practices of Medical Genetics
++++++++++

Central nervous dysfunction can be seen with basal ganglion involvement.

SOURCE:
Acute Intermittent Porhyria
Anne LeMaistre, M.D.
1995
TMC
+++++++


Central nervous dysfunction can be seen as well with basal ganglion
involvement.

Electrolyte imbalances must be immediately corrected with intravenous drip.

SOURCE:
Lifelines:
Journal of Emergency Medicine
October 1998
123: 437-443
Emergency Treatment of the Porphyric Patient
Kirsch, N,.E., M.D.
+++++++++++++
Central nervous dysfunction can be seen as well with cerebellar and basal
ganglion involvement in the acute porphyrias.


SOURCE:
Acute Intermittent Porhyria
Anne LeMaistre, M.D.
1995
TMC
++++++++++++++++

There can be involvement of the basal ganglion in the acute porphyrias.

SOURCE:
The Hepatic Porphyrias
Scmid, R.
Seminars in Liver DIsease
2:87 1982
++++++++++
Central nervous dysfunction can be seen as
well with hallucinations, seizures, coma, bulbar
paralysis, hypothalamic dysfunction, or cerebellar and
basal ganglion involvement.

SOURCE:

Acute Intermittent Porhyria
Anne LeMaistre, M.D.
1995
TMC
++++++++++++

The basal ganglion is any of several masses of subcortical gray matter in each
cerebral hemisphere that seem to be involved in the regulation of voluntary
movement

SOURCE:
Medical Dictionary
2000
+++++++++

The basal ganglion is any of several masses of gray matter embedded in the
cerebral hemispheres that are involved in the regulation of voluntary movement.
Also called basal nucleus.

SOURCE:
The American Heritage
Dictionary of the English Language
Fourth Edition. 2000
Houghton Mifflin Company.
++++++++++++

The basal ganglia and cerebellum are large collections of nuclei that modify
movement on a minute-to-minute basis.

Motor cortex sends information to both, and both structures send information
right back to cortex via the thalamus.

(Remember, to get to cortex you must go through thalamus.)

The output of the cerebellum is excitatory, while the basal ganglia are inhibitory.
The balance between these two systems allows for smooth, coordinated
movement, and a disturbance in either system will show up as movement
disorders.

SOURCE:
Washington University School of Medicine
Neuroscience Department
+++++++++++

The cerebellum is often associated with the basal ganglion disruptions
experienced during acute episodes of porphyria.

SOURCE:
Robert Johnson MD
Internal Medicine
++++++++

The cerebellum is involved in the coordination of movement.

A simple way to look at its purpose is that it compares what you thought you
were going to do (according to motor cortex) with what is actually happening
down in the limbs (according to proprioceptive feedback), and corrects the
movement if there is a problem.

The cerebellum is also partly responsible for motor learning, such as riding a
bicycle.

Unlike the cerebrum, which works entirely on a contralateral basis, the
cerebellum works ipsilaterally.

SOURCE:
Washington University School of Medicine
Neuroscience Department
+++++++++++


The cerebellum ("little brain") has convolutions similar to those of cerebral
cortex, only the folds are much smaller.

Like the cerebrum, the cerebellum has an outer cortex, an inner white matter,
and deep nuclei below the white matter.

SOURCE:
Washington University School of Medicine
Neuroscience Department
+++++++++++








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